Pumpipumpe
Pumpipumpe

Share your stuff with neighbours and strangers

Such a great project. They also have a map so you can share with more people than just your direct neighbours.

Pumpipumpe is committed to more conscious and sustainable consumption. What do we really have to own and what are we able to easily share? How often do we actually use our power drill? How many vacuum cleaners does an apartment building need?

Pumpipumpe makes all the useful things which are rarely used that are hidden in homes, cupboards, boxes and basements, visible. The mailbox stickers draw attention neighbours who pass on a daily basis. The goal is to create a dialogue between neighbors and discuss the potentials of urban neighborhoods being real active networks, especially in the age of increasing digitization.

Pumpipumpe is not a ready to use product but a tool that can and will help you activate your own real network in the neighborhood.

Stick the stickers of the items you are willing to lend on your mailbox and then share the rest with your neighbours! Pass on the remaining stickers to your neighbours, this way you can find people who have items that you do not have. Spread the word about Pumpipumpe. The more households join in, the better it works!

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Random product idea generator

Random product idea generator

Protobot

Protobot is very simple: it generates a product idea by matching a random product category with a random constraint.

Right now, the English source list has 240 product ideas and 196 constraints. This means you have over 47,000 product ideas at your fingertips. Some are brilliant. Some are bizarre. Some are controversial. Some are hilarious. Some are very, very wrong. Have fun!

When we’re in a flow state, defining and solving problems creatively, designing is a joy.

But that groove is elusive. Especially when we’re adjusting to working with a new team of people; working on a problem that seems boring, unsolvable, or both; hungry, tired, stressed; or just sick of working on the same thing.

A great way to build creative energy and get to flow is through short bursts of structured exercises, or warm-ups, unrelated to our design problem. They’re a breath of fresh air when we’ve been thinking along the same well-worn paths for hours, days, weeks. Designers and design thinking folks know this already. When we’re running sprints or workshops, we borrow from improv theater, which brings a rich, deep set of games that give our brains a rest and a stretch at the same time.

As well as improv games work for designers, though, they’re not really about design. They’re about relationships, stories, and emotions. They’re not usually about objects, artifacts, materials, or planned experiences. As I teach design and design thinking, I’ve been missing a warm-up exercise that is about designing products and services, but inhabits the same wild-and-free place as improv games. I know plenty of improv-like techniques that work within a design process for prototyping a given idea in different ways (see this great card set by my colleagues Holger and Eva). But I wanted a quick, energizing exercise that stood on its own.

I happened upon a book of games used by the Surrealists in the 1920s – Ernst, Magritte, Bréton, and others. These games are even less traditionally game-like than improv games. They’re generation and combination techniques. The exercises often involve juxtaposing things that don’t naturally fit together. Sometimes the material comes from the other people in the room, and sometimes it comes from books, magazines, or art. Players are often forced to follow a nonsense path far longer than is comfortable. The results are sometimes funny, often deep, and sometimes a bit scary.

Then I thought: what if we used the surreal, barrier-busting power of juxtaposition and recombination to create a prototyping warm-up? So, on a tea-fueled Monday evening, I wrote Protobot. I’m going to use it in my classes and workshops in my day job at the D-School, and I hope you get some use out of it, too. Drop me a line at here@molly.is to let me know what you think!

Protobot is very simple: it generates a product idea by matching a random product category with a random constraint.

Right now, the English source list has 240 product ideas and 196 constraints. This means you have over 47,000 product ideas at your fingertips. Some are brilliant. Some are bizarre. Some are controversial. Some are hilarious. Some are very, very wrong. Have fun!

When we’re in a flow state, defining and solving problems creatively, designing is a joy.

But that groove is elusive. Especially when we’re adjusting to working with a new team of people; working on a problem that seems boring, unsolvable, or both; hungry, tired, stressed; or just sick of working on the same thing.

A great way to build creative energy and get to flow is through short bursts of structured exercises, or warm-ups, unrelated to our design problem. They’re a breath of fresh air when we’ve been thinking along the same well-worn paths for hours, days, weeks. Designers and design thinking folks know this already. When we’re running sprints or workshops, we borrow from improv theater, which brings a rich, deep set of games that give our brains a rest and a stretch at the same time.

As well as improv games work for designers, though, they’re not really about design. They’re about relationships, stories, and emotions. They’re not usually about objects, artifacts, materials, or planned experiences. As I teach design and design thinking, I’ve been missing a warm-up exercise that is about designing products and services, but inhabits the same wild-and-free place as improv games. I know plenty of improv-like techniques that work within a design process for prototyping a given idea in different ways (see this great card set by my colleagues Holger and Eva). But I wanted a quick, energizing exercise that stood on its own.

I happened upon a book of games used by the Surrealists in the 1920s – Ernst, Magritte, Bréton, and others. These games are even less traditionally game-like than improv games. They’re generation and combination techniques. The exercises often involve juxtaposing things that don’t naturally fit together. Sometimes the material comes from the other people in the room, and sometimes it comes from books, magazines, or art. Players are often forced to follow a nonsense path far longer than is comfortable. The results are sometimes funny, often deep, and sometimes a bit scary.

Then I thought: what if we used the surreal, barrier-busting power of juxtaposition and recombination to create a prototyping warm-up? So, on a tea-fueled Monday evening, I wrote Protobot. I’m going to use it in my classes and workshops in my day job at the D-School, and I hope you get some use out of it, too. Drop me a line at here@molly.is to let me know what you think!

Internal Link
Updated on
September 4, 2019

Global Climate Strike

This September, millions of us will walk out of our workplaces and homes to join young climate strikers on the streets and demand an end to the age of fossil fuels. Our house is on fire — let’s act like it. We demand climate justice for everyone.

This September, millions of us will walk out of our workplaces and homes to join young climate strikers on the streets and demand an end to the age of fossil fuels. Our house is on fire — let’s act like it. We demand climate justice for everyone.

Internal Link
Updated on
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Designer, engineer and thinker

Designer, engineer and thinker

Samim

I'm a designer, engineer and thinker, operating at the intersection of Machine Learning, Flora-Fauna-Human-Computer-Interaction, reGenerative Culture, OpenSource, Mindfulness and Creativity. I'm interested in a range of Ideas, but my attention lies on developing instruments and habits to simply sit & breath, here and now.

I'm a designer, engineer and thinker, operating at the intersection of Machine Learning, Flora-Fauna-Human-Computer-Interaction, reGenerative Culture, OpenSource, Mindfulness and Creativity. I'm interested in a range of Ideas, but my attention lies on developing instruments and habits to simply sit & breath, here and now.

Internal Link
Updated on
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Mapping the bike friendliness and improvements in Berlin

Mapping the bike friendliness and improvements in Berlin

Fix My Berlin

Wir wollen, dass Berlin eine richtig gute Fahrradstadt wird. Auf dieser Plattform begleiten wir das kommende Berliner Mobilitätsgesetz. Auf der Karte siehst du, was die Stadt alles für den Radverkehr plant. Der von uns entwickelte Happy-Bike-Index zeigt dir wo du zur Zeit in Berlin schon entspannt und sicher Radfahren kannst und wo es noch gefährlich ist. Nach und nach bereiten wir weitere Daten zum Radverkehr auf und veröffentlichen Sie hier auf der Plattform. In Zukunft wollen wir auch den Dialog zwischen Verwaltung und Bürger*innen stärken und konstruktiv gestalten. Denn gemeinsam kommen wir schneller zu einer Stadt, die nicht nur für Radfahrer*innen sondern für alle Berliner*innen lebenswerter ist.

Wir wollen, dass Berlin eine richtig gute Fahrradstadt wird. Auf dieser Plattform begleiten wir das kommende Berliner Mobilitätsgesetz. Auf der Karte siehst du, was die Stadt alles für den Radverkehr plant. Der von uns entwickelte Happy-Bike-Index zeigt dir wo du zur Zeit in Berlin schon entspannt und sicher Radfahren kannst und wo es noch gefährlich ist. Nach und nach bereiten wir weitere Daten zum Radverkehr auf und veröffentlichen Sie hier auf der Plattform. In Zukunft wollen wir auch den Dialog zwischen Verwaltung und Bürger*innen stärken und konstruktiv gestalten. Denn gemeinsam kommen wir schneller zu einer Stadt, die nicht nur für Radfahrer*innen sondern für alle Berliner*innen lebenswerter ist.

Internal Link
Updated on
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Water quality of Berlin swimming spots

Water quality of Berlin swimming spots

Berliner Badestellen
Internal Link
Updated on
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Interdisciplinary research group at FH Potsdam situated between interface design, computer science and the humanities

Interdisciplinary research group at FH Potsdam situated between interface design, computer science and the humanities

Urban Complexity Lab

We are an interdisciplinary research group at Fachhochschule Potsdam situated between interface design, computer science, and the humanities. Our work revolves around information visualization with a particular focus on the challenges and questions arising from social, cultural, and technological transformations. Our mission is to make sense of comprehensive datasets and complex issues by developing creative and critical approaches to visualization. All our research projects are collaborative in nature. We are working with academic and cultural institutions as well as public and private organizations, especially in the contexts of digital humanities, smart cities, and science communication. The lab is a collaboration between the Department of Design and the Institute for Urban Futures. At the junction of design teaching and visualization research, we strive to have an impact in both academia and the world of practice. For the physical and social space of the lab, our ambition is to cultivate a stimulating environment for a transdisciplinary community of designers, developers, and scholars engaging with contemporary issues of societal relevance. We are keen to share our work with the broader public via interactive prototypes, exhibitions and workshops, and with our academic peers through conferences and journals. The research lab is jointly directed by Marian Dörk, research professor for information visualization, and Boris Müller, professor for interaction design. Located in the main building on the FHP campus in Potsdam, the lab is a place where researchers and students with varying backgrounds especially interface design, informatics, and cultural studies are working together. We frequently invite practitioners and researchers to our public lecture series information+visualization to speak about current topics in data visualization.

We are an interdisciplinary research group at Fachhochschule Potsdam situated between interface design, computer science, and the humanities. Our work revolves around information visualization with a particular focus on the challenges and questions arising from social, cultural, and technological transformations. Our mission is to make sense of comprehensive datasets and complex issues by developing creative and critical approaches to visualization. All our research projects are collaborative in nature. We are working with academic and cultural institutions as well as public and private organizations, especially in the contexts of digital humanities, smart cities, and science communication. The lab is a collaboration between the Department of Design and the Institute for Urban Futures. At the junction of design teaching and visualization research, we strive to have an impact in both academia and the world of practice. For the physical and social space of the lab, our ambition is to cultivate a stimulating environment for a transdisciplinary community of designers, developers, and scholars engaging with contemporary issues of societal relevance. We are keen to share our work with the broader public via interactive prototypes, exhibitions and workshops, and with our academic peers through conferences and journals. The research lab is jointly directed by Marian Dörk, research professor for information visualization, and Boris Müller, professor for interaction design. Located in the main building on the FHP campus in Potsdam, the lab is a place where researchers and students with varying backgrounds especially interface design, informatics, and cultural studies are working together. We frequently invite practitioners and researchers to our public lecture series information+visualization to speak about current topics in data visualization.

Internal Link
Updated on
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Surprise weekend trip with strangers and fun challenges

Surprise weekend trip with strangers and fun challenges

Epic Llama

Would you like to break out of your comfort zone, meet inspiring people and discover a new city? Last year I met 5 strangers at the airport, flew to Bucharest for a weekend, drank shots with strangers, got a piggyback ride from strangers, ended up giving free hugs to strangers, went on a scavenger hunt… and came back to Berlin with 5 new friends. 100% recommended if you want to break out of your daily routine, meet new people and challenge yourself!

Photo of me with sunglasses, an inflatable banana in the right hand and a free-hugs sign in the left.

We plan epic adventures to surprise destinations where you will have to complete a series of fun challenges that will make you discover the city in a totally unique and fun way! You won't know where you're going until 1 hour before departure. You can either plan your own adventure with friends (from anywhere in Europe) or join a small group of awesome, like-minded travelers (aged 20-35s).

We plan epic adventures to surprise destinations where you will have to complete a series of fun challenges that will make you discover the city in a totally unique and fun way! You won't know where you're going until 1 hour before departure. You can either plan your own adventure with friends (from anywhere in Europe) or join a small group of awesome, like-minded travelers (aged 20-35s).

Internal Link
Updated on
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Berlin store selling food without packaging

Berlin store selling food without packaging

Original Unverpackt

Seit November 2012 arbeiten wir, das sind Milena Glimbovski und das gesamte Team, daran, unseren Traum vom plastikfreiem und unverpackten Einkaufen wahr werden zu lassen. Neben Job und Studium wurde der Geschäftsplan geschrieben, ein Lieferantennetzwerk aufgebaut und die Finanzierung durch eine Crowdfunding-Kampagne realisiert. 2014 hieß es in Berlin Kreuzberg dann endlich “Unverpackt für alle”: Milena Glimbovski und das Team eröffnen unter großem Getöse in den Medien den ersten Laden in Berlin. Seit 2016 versenden wir in unserem Online Shop auch Non-Food Produkte rund um den Zero Waste Lifestyle an all diejenigen, die nicht um die Ecke von Original Unverpackt leben. 2017 kam dann das OU Magazin dazu, in dem wir unsere Leser in leicht verdaulichen Geschichten zu nachhaltigen Themen rund um Ernährung, Lifestyle, Gesellschaft, Umwelt und Zero Waste informieren. Seit Anbeginn hält Milena Vorträge rund um die Themen Nachhaltigkeit und Trends im Einzelhandel, Zero Waste und Gründertum. Hier erfahrt ihr mehr.

Seit November 2012 arbeiten wir, das sind Milena Glimbovski und das gesamte Team, daran, unseren Traum vom plastikfreiem und unverpackten Einkaufen wahr werden zu lassen. Neben Job und Studium wurde der Geschäftsplan geschrieben, ein Lieferantennetzwerk aufgebaut und die Finanzierung durch eine Crowdfunding-Kampagne realisiert. 2014 hieß es in Berlin Kreuzberg dann endlich “Unverpackt für alle”: Milena Glimbovski und das Team eröffnen unter großem Getöse in den Medien den ersten Laden in Berlin. Seit 2016 versenden wir in unserem Online Shop auch Non-Food Produkte rund um den Zero Waste Lifestyle an all diejenigen, die nicht um die Ecke von Original Unverpackt leben. 2017 kam dann das OU Magazin dazu, in dem wir unsere Leser in leicht verdaulichen Geschichten zu nachhaltigen Themen rund um Ernährung, Lifestyle, Gesellschaft, Umwelt und Zero Waste informieren. Seit Anbeginn hält Milena Vorträge rund um die Themen Nachhaltigkeit und Trends im Einzelhandel, Zero Waste und Gründertum. Hier erfahrt ihr mehr.

Internal Link
Updated on
June 14, 2019

Swiss bags+ made from truck tarps

Swiss bags+ made from truck tarps

Freitag

When I lost my wallet (also made from truck tarps) on my vacation in Madagascar, I was kind of excited to have an excuse to finally buy a product from Freitag. Read about the birth of Freitag.

In 1993, graphic designers Markus and Daniel Freitag were looking for a functional, water-repellent and robust bag to hold their creative work. Inspired by the multicolored heavy traffic that rumbled through the Zurich transit intersection in front of their flat, they developed a messenger bag from used truck tarpaulins, discarded bicycle inner tubes and car seat belts. This is how the first FREITAG bags took shape in the living room of their shared apartment – each one recycled, each one unique.

In 1993, graphic designers Markus and Daniel Freitag were looking for a functional, water-repellent and robust bag to hold their creative work. Inspired by the multicolored heavy traffic that rumbled through the Zurich transit intersection in front of their flat, they developed a messenger bag from used truck tarpaulins, discarded bicycle inner tubes and car seat belts. This is how the first FREITAG bags took shape in the living room of their shared apartment – each one recycled, each one unique.

Internal Link
Updated on
July 13, 2019
Design System